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Training in the "now"
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When you are doing a technique on your uke, what are you thinking about? Are you focused on what you saw demonstrated? Are you focused on what you want to happen? Or are you paying close attention to what is occurring at that moment. There are very few persons in our art who would deliberately injure another person in training, and yet injures do occur. We all know that a little pain is how we know that this will work when done for real, but too often good people do injure their uke ---- without ever meaning too. Just possibly this is what happens when your mind is not in the "now" but focused on either the past,(what you saw) or the future, (what you want to happen).
When training stay in the "now", pay very close attention to what your uke is feeling and how s/he is responding. You can become aware enough this way to have them feel the effectiveness and still not cause them injury.

Posted on: 2008/6/16 1:02
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Ed Martin aka Papa-san
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Maybe too much speed for that effort (with that Uke) to get from "now" to the "future", too...?

Posted on: 2008/6/16 3:31
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Jack once told us (my paraphrase here) that taijutsu is like pulling out onto the freeway. You don't just punch it and rip out into the mix of cars - surely you would cause quite an accident.

Likewise, you don't just creep out into the lanes, stop and look around, and just go about your own pace/way. That would also cause quite the accident (especially on the Jersey turnpike!).

Instead, you speed up to find the pace of traffic and find the correct space to merge into gently, while matching the speed of everybody else around you. Once there, you can adjust to move into spaces around you so that you can be in whatever lanes you wish.

In order to do this, you must be in the "now". But, you also have a purpose in mind (where you want to go) and a foundation of skills to enable you to operate your vehicle in an effective and safe manner (clears throat).

It's a balance to be in the "now", while holding on to some assemblance of what 'should' happen (i.e. specific kata). But, it's in the adaptiveness of the "now" that makes the likelihood of what 'should' happen - happen. That's the benefit of experience and correct training.

Posted on: 2008/6/16 3:50
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Darren Dumas

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Re: Training in the "now"
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I've heard Jack give that same excellent analogy Darren. Here's another thought since most of us have heard Dr Hatsumi say that the mistake most people make is to train too fast, right? Well I think many interpreted that to mean train slow so we don't injure our uke. What if there is a deeper reason? What if he also meant that we must become much more aware of the situation our uke is in and the best way to develope that is to train slow? Just maybe it is another effort to help us become more aware in what we are doing.

Posted on: 2008/6/16 11:17
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Ed Martin aka Papa-san
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Re: Training in the "now"
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To build on the analogy......

Would you say that a race car driver is not "in the now", simply because hes going 200+ mph ?

Posted on: 2008/6/16 12:03
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Quote:

D_Cecc wrote:
To build on the analogy......

Would you say that a race car driver is not "in the now", simply because hes going 200+ mph ?


No, I'd say he is even more "in the now". Any slight misdirection of thought, misjudge of things, etc is more likely to cause greater accidents - because things are moving so fast and adjustments/corrections need to be done even more subtle (i.e. easy to overcorrect, for example).

I've raced enough patrol cars in my day, with lights and sirens blaring, to know exactly what this means. Add to that having to always know what direction I was heading (North, South, etc) and what intersections I've passed and am heading towards - meanwhile being sensitive to what idiots may pull out in front of you, what the suspect may throw out the window or shoot back at you, and on and on.

Yeah, in those moments, you REALLY need to be "in the now"...

Posted on: 2008/6/16 15:42
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Darren Dumas

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Re: Training in the "now"
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
Here's another thought since most of us have heard Dr Hatsumi say that the mistake most people make is to train too fast, right? Well I think many interpreted that to mean train slow so we don't injure our uke.


I heard Sôke once (in 1996) commenting that "up to Nidan one should train softly, and from Sandan it should become hard... And after Godan they meet me [Sôke]...."

Posted on: 2008/6/16 16:10
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Ari Julku
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Re: Training in the "now"
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After hearing about Greg Dilley's passing, I am very much in the now.



Thomas Curran

Tokyo, Japan

Posted on: 2008/6/16 17:33
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Thomas, this is not the best place to mention that. Oh, well. For those of you who knew him, have a look at Nancy's blog.

The best way to honour him is to be here now.

Merge.

Posted on: 2008/6/16 21:27
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Re: Training in the "now"
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Quote:

Papa-san wrote:
I've heard Jack give that same excellent analogy Darren. Here's another thought since most of us have heard Dr Hatsumi say that the mistake most people make is to train too fast, right? Well I think many interpreted that to mean train slow so we don't injure our uke. What if there is a deeper reason? What if he also meant that we must become much more aware of the situation our uke is in and the best way to develope that is to train slow? Just maybe it is another effort to help us become more aware in what we are doing.


Ed, I always felt that was an equally important reason for training slowly at first. Since we agree here, of course you must be right.

Darren, great analogy with the police pursuit example.

Posted on: 2008/6/17 0:13
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Dale Seago
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