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Training notes
Just Passing Through
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2011/1/25 21:12
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Hi all,

(this is my first post in this amazing forum)

I go to bujinkan training 2 times a week and right down a lot of notes from my instructor.

I wonder how you "get the best" of your notes ?

Do you re-process them ? do you classify them ? how often ?

Can you share your experience about your notes ?

Thanks a ot for your asnwers

Alexis Sindicic

Posted on: 2011/1/29 19:45
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Re: Training notes
Active Kutakian
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Alexis, welcome!

I tend to divide my self-training into two areas. The first is things I like to do. Those I practice to keep me motivated and enjoying practice. The second is things I don't do well. On those I have to practice a lot more because my body is not used to that motion.

Know what you like and practice that for encouragement. Know what you have a problem with and practice that a lot more. In everything, practice the basics.

Leam

Posted on: 2011/1/29 21:22
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Re: Training notes
Just Passing Through
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Thanks for your answer

Posted on: 2011/1/29 23:00
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Re: Training notes
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I highly recommend a notebook. I am not advocating being a martial scholar and certainly you don't have to try and write down every detail or technique. What I do is jot down some things that stick out or create an "ah-ha!" moment. Also, I will tend to scribble a quick sketch or two, maybe on foot placement, kamae or something, as I am a visual learner. Your notes will not be accurate, per se, and that doesn't matter as much as the process of writing these things down as key to internalizing the information. Bullet notes, key words, little sketches and such provide great inspiration and give something to refer back to later when you are trying to remember something.

In the end, you'll have a book of your own 'personal densho' and will find it more valuable than the countless published books out there on the market. I still go back to mine and reread things I've written back then - with the new eyes of today.

Just be careful not to let the note taking draw your attention from being 'in the moment' of what's happening. You may miss the key point that you need!

Posted on: 2011/1/30 7:06
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Re: Training notes
Village Old Timer
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Here is a discussion we had a few years ago....

http://www.kutaki.org/modules/newbb/v ... at&order=ASC&type=&mode=0

Marty


Posted on: 2011/1/30 8:02
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Re: Training notes
Just Passing Through
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Thank you Darren and marty !!

Posted on: 2011/1/31 3:03
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Re: Training notes
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I keep notes, and jot things down. However, I never really go back over them, unless I'm looking for a phrase or a chuckle.

Now, I try to study video of myself doing stuff or attempt to look at the movement behind the movement. Or rather the individual muscle groups that are used to make a movement and try to minimize the firing of muscles that don't need to be used to make the movement as well as using different muscles to make the same movement.

Basically, I study different things about my taijutsu now than I used to. In the beginning knowing the name of basic techniques and how to do them in a "gross motor control" fashion was important. Now, I want to make these same movements without using muscles that I don't need to use and from a more advantageous position.

Names of techniques are only place holders for movements for me now. Kata training is a way of maximizing my position and movements without giving anything away and using least amount of muscle needed to produce the desired results.

All the rest goes into the "feeling" category.


Notes are great in the beginning, but haven't really helped much since besides having a quick reference for a kata or technique.


Posted on: 2011/2/1 1:59
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Re: Training notes
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I think that notes are a very useful thing for several reasons. First off, being forced to formulate something helps you understanding it. Second, if you're used to taking notes, it's easier for you to explain what you mean, apart from "can't be explained". Then reflection is always a very good thing and doing it in writing clarifies often the chaos of thoughts. Of course it will help you to remember and enable you to look up later as well.

Quote:
Notes are great in the beginning, but haven't really helped much since besides having a quick reference for a kata or technique.


I have a different opinion about that and this really depends on the quality of your notes. If you only write down the "steps" of kata, then notes can - of course - be of no more use than looking up this. But please note, that even the densho and makimono are not just technical descriptions, but experiences, insights and higher lessons as well. Takamatsu has left a very rich wealth of documents apart from kata descriptions. If Hatsumi says that he always learns new things from those, I'd say that you very much underestimate the usefulness of notes.

Posted on: 2011/3/3 3:58
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